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Binary Number System



Computers use binary Number. And some questions can be fixed using binary number.
A Binary number is created up of only 0s and 1s.
110100
Example of a Binary Number
There is no 2,3,4,5,6,7,8 or 9 in Binary!
How do we Depend using Binary?
Binary                   
0                             We begin at 0
1                             Then 1
???                        But then there is no icon for 2 ... what do we do?



                                Decimal                                
Well how do we count
in Decimal?                        0                             Start at 0
                                ...                           Count 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, and then...
                                9                             This is the last number in Decimal
                                10                          So we begin returning at 0 again, but add 1 on the left
The same factor is done in binary ...
                Binary                   
                0                             Start at 0
             1                             Then 1
••           10                          Now begin returning at 0 again, but add 1 on the left
•••        11                          1 more
••••     ???                        But NOW what ... ?

                                Decimal                                
What happens in Decimal ... ?                   99                          When we run out of number, we ...
                                100                        ... begin returning at 0 again, but add 1 on the left
And that is what we do in binary ...
                Binary                   
                0                             Start at 0
             1                             Then 1
••           10                          Start returning at 0 again, but add 1 on the left
•••        11                           
••••     100                        start returning at 0 again, and add one to the amount on the remaining...
... but time is already at 1 so it also goes returning to 0 ...
... and 1 is included to the next position on the left
•••••   101                         
••••••                110                         
•••••••             111                         
••••••••           1000                      Start returning at 0 again (for all 3 digits),
add 1 on the left
•••••••••        1001                      And so on!

See how it is done in this little business presentation (press play):
Decimal vs Binary
Here are some comparative values:
Decimal:               0              1              2              3              4              5              6              7              8              9              10           11           12           13                14           15
Binary:  0              1              10           11           100         101         110         111         1000       1001       1010       1011       1100       1101       1110                1111

Here are some bigger comparative values:
Decimal:               20           25           30           40           50           100         200         500
Binary:  10100    11001    11110    101000  110010  1100100                11001000             111110100
"Binary is as simple as 1, 10, 11."
Now see how you can use Binary to count previous 1,000 on your fingers:
Activity: Binary Fingers
Position
In the Decimal Program there are the Models, 10's, Thousands, etc
In Binary, there are Models, Couples, Four legs, etc, like this:

This is 1×8 + 1×4 + 0×2 + 1 + 1×(1/2) + 0×(1/4) + 1×(1/8)
= 13.625 in Decimal
Numbers can be placed to the remaining or right of the factor, to indicate principles higher than one or less than one.
10.1
                The number to the remaining of the factor is a whole number (10 for example)
                 
As we shift further remaining, every number place
gets 2 periods bigger.
                 
                The first number on the right indicates sections (1/2).
                 
                As we shift further right, every number position
gets  2 periods more compact (half as big).
Example: 10.1
             The "10" indicates 2 in decimal,
             The ".1" indicates 50 percent,
             So "10.1" in binary is 2.5 in decimal
You can do alterations at Binary to Decimal to Hexadecimal Ripper.
Words
The term binary comes from "Bi-" significance two. We see "bi-" in terms such as "bicycle" (two wheels) or "binocular" (two eyes).
                When you say a binary number, articulate each number (example, the binary number "101" is verbal as "one zero one", or sometimes "one-oh-one"). This way individuals don't get puzzled with the decimal number.
A individual binary number (like "0" or "1") is known as a "bit". For example 11010 is five pieces lengthy.
The term bit is created up from the terms "binary digit"
How to Display that a Variety is Binary
To reveal that several is a binary number, adhere to it with a little 2 like this: 1012
This way individuals won't think it is the decimal number "101" (one number of and one).
Examples
Example: What is 11112 in Decimal?
             The "1" on the remaining is in the "2×2×2" position, so that indicates 1×2×2×2 (=8)
             The next "1" is in the "2×2" position, so that indicates 1×2×2 (=4)
             The next "1" is in the "2" position, so that indicates 1×2 (=2)
             The last "1" is in the units position, so that indicates 1
             Answer: 1111 = 8+4+2+1 = 15 in Decimal
Example: What is 10012 in Decimal?
             The "1" on the remaining is in the "2×2×2" position, so that indicates 1×2×2×2 (=8)
             The "0" is in the "2×2" position, so that indicates 0×2×2 (=0)
             The next "0" is in the "2" position, so that indicates 0×2 (=0)
             The last "1" is in the units position, so that indicates 1
             Answer: 1001 = 8+0+0+1 = 9 in Decimal
Example: What is 1.12 in Decimal?
             The "1" on the remaining part is in the units position, so that indicates 1.
             The 1 on the right part is in the "halves" position, so that indicates 1×(1/2)
             So, 1.1 is "1 and 1 half" = 1.5 in Decimal
Example: What is 10.112 in Decimal?
             The "1" is in the "2" position, so that indicates 1×2 (=2)
             The "0" is in the units position, so that indicates 0
             The "1" on the right of the factor is in the "halves" position, so that indicates 1×(1/2)
             The last "1" on the right part is in the "quarters" position, so that indicates 1×(1/4)
             So, 10.11 is 2+0+1/2+1/4 = 2.75 in Decimal
"There are 10 types of peoples in the world,
those who comprehend binary figures, and those who don't."

Question 1 Query 2 Query 3 Query 4 Query 5 Query 6 Query 7 Query 8 Query 9 Query 10  

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